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administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
frederick, but how are you doing? >> edward snowden's nsa revelations reaching new heights, getting spoofed on snl. but now the leaker is seeking ce clemens city. >>> and toronto's embattled mayor says he will stay in office. >>> and the sbepgs intentional that was the youtube music awards. that's a real thing? it is? okay. this is "way too early". good morning. i'm bill karins in for brian shactman. it's monday, november 4th. we'll also show and you scary moment in last night's texas/colt game. but first, the country's third biggest airport fully up and running again, but underlying safety concerns after a man used an assault arrival to kill one tsa agent and badly injured two other people. paul ciancia is in critical condition after being shot multiple times by officers. he was carrying five high capacity magazines, a bag of ammo and happennd written lette explaining his rampage. gun control advocates say the incident is unlikely to spark any head way in the limit of gun sales. >>> later today, the president will speak at an organizing for action health care summit looking to rally grass
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
this was going on but once the snowden documents came out, they had to deal with it politically at home. >> what should they do to handle that? how can we help them at hope, mary? >> i prefer the kind of -- sort of things that senator feinstein is suggesting, which really aren't major changes in the way the policy would work. the fact of the matter is everybody spies. the french intelligence, former french head of intelligence came out last week and said, what are you talking about, everybody's been doing this. helmut schmidt said when he was chancellor of germany he assumed he was being spied on. this has been going on since the cold war. so basically yes, maybe we should provide some cosmetic cover in order to help, for example, merkel regain some trust in the relationship with the u.s. beyond that, i don't think we should do anything. >> dianne feinstein being the chairman of the senate intelligence committee. she's moving some legislation to put some -- a review of all of these things. there's also a report this week, joe, that the nsa was spying, breaking into google and yahoo! networks ove
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant with the news and release of a new slide showing that the n.s.a. bypassed this system, gaining entry to yahoo and google's data centres by breaking into their fibre optic cables. u.s. citizens no longer receive protections as all the information is considered foreign. >> the real concern is the government uses the tapping of overseas cablings as a back door. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass to do what they like. >> the white house derives that authority from execu
an open letter written by edward snowden. he says mass surveillance is a global problem, but the united states and british intelligence agencies are the worst defenders. snowden's manifesto follows his request for clemency. the obama administration won't each discuss it and says he should return to face justice. >>> yesterday a goal line stand the redskins made to keep the chargers out of the end zone, that is why the skins fans are waking up this morning. they came up out on top. quarterback darrell young scored three touchdowns including the game winner. it was a good coming out for him. rg iii 121 yards. skins improved to 5-3 on the season. >>> more people may be skeptical than excited about twitter's ipo. >> no doubt about the obenshain tried to outlaw. birth control pills. rape or incest. criminals, felons shows, a month law, in bulk. instead of dictating to women, criminals. this ad. >> just about 4:40 on this monday morning. some monuments are still lit up. enjoy it while we've got it. it is cold, upper 20s, mainly in the 30s, a sunny start, partly sunny finish, we should be in t
to foreign communications. you know, when the snowden documents started to come out -- >> snowden being the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goalpost. >> domestically the political back lash. there are -- >> against the nsa -- >> there's sensenbrenner in the house -- >> especially when there's legislation to stop the nsa from data collection, let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done. and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that it happened in the 1970s, which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's, i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get some momentum. but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, is this -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it woen be happening anymore. basically if the u.s. stops doing it then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians, you k
snowden met with a german lawmaker in moscow he reportedly said he is willing to testify. he will go to nogermany as longs that country doesn't send him to the us. he said in a manifesto today that he feels justified in spilling intelligence secrets. the german lawmaker who met edward snowden said the confessed leaker wants to testify in front of congress. >> he stressed that he is ready to come before the german parliament to testify and that he would rather go before the pairliment and put the facts on the table. >> she says he is making his own decisions and is not being manipulated by the russians. >> despite the police state surveillance state we have been turning into. i think he would love to come back some day if the conditions plitly were different. >> nsa chief alexander, the turmoil now giving him second thoughts on whether spying on al lies like german chancellor merkel was worth it. >> i think those partnerships have greater value than some of the collection and we ought to look at it like that. >> the intelligence community denies collecting reports from citizens callin
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
. about a month later, edward snowden began releasing real elevations about massive surveillance. in this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. and as you've heard from greg, it's our mission to try to improve the quality of public policy decision making which is an important discussion to be had. that's why we brought together the panel. people have different views. while everyone here has deep expertise in experience with part of it. we're hoping to have ab open discussion about it. in will be some thing they'll be unable to question. unable to an and just because of the situation. but we're going try to guide the discussion over a few topics today. we're going to start can with try to understand what works in intelligence and security. why do we feel we need to put it in place. we're going turn to what are the increased risk of mass collection of information on the public. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us
official says there has been no cle inside ci snowden and believe he should return to the united states to face justice. the joints reaction comes after a german magazine published a let frer snowed, in it is he says he's seeing a positive reaction to disclosing classified information and that he wants the united states to stop treating him like a criminal. >>> this just into us. a major announcement from blackberry. it is abandoning all plans to sell the company. the company ceo will also be stepping down. confusing, right? our chief business correspondent christine romans is in new york to explain this to us. >> this is the gdemise of the crack berry. the worker bees used it. in washington, on wall street. the close has slowly unbound, the stock down 20%. they have halted trading of the sta shares. the ceo is out. he had bet 100% on a new operating system and new blackberries to invigorate the company in the midst of all the competition out there. and it just didn't work. the company had been trying to find a buyer, really couldn't. and now there is a new ceo that will take over. basi
a new job. a lawyer for edward snowden says his client works and technical support for a russian website. mr. snowden fled to hong kong and then to russia to escape aarges that he uncovered surveillance program at the national security agency. mr. snowden granted asylum in russia in august after being stuck at the moscow airport for more than a month. his whereabouts and russia remain up secret. a senate committee will investigate the shooting at the washington navy yard's this morning. today's hearing is to investigate whether background checks are adequate. areomes as officials analyzing how defense contractor aaron alexis was able to have a secret clearance despite a series of violent outbursts, repeated russia's with the law, and concerns about his mental health. live coverage of the hearing at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. spancan see that here on c- or listen on c-span radio. these are the latest headlines on c-span radio. was officiallyg my grandmother's white house were trip. lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of the first ladies to hang in the white house. she thought that
about -- tell us about this drawing that was leaked alodge with some other edward snowden documents. does it show how the nsa broke into google. >> >> yes, think of google as having multiple data centers around the world. what apparently, it did, the fiberoptic connections, they tabbed into. they put a clip on or had a way to monitor what was going through those fiberoptic cables. that's something we've learned from snowden that they've been doing around the world. but it's particularly disturbing that it's done with google. google is unique. it's the only entim tientity in that has a mission to collect all the world's snfgs. remember, the nsa is only collecting information about people that they think are a threat to the united states and others. >> so, scott, some of the biggest names in high-tech are now working with the obama administrati administration what does this say about the government's handle on tech nothing. >> i think it was obviously a black eye. something this big should have been rolled out with a lot more test iing. anybody that's in the business knows that you do
edward snowden. >>> well changes on the security clearance system for the federal workers could be in the wakes of the shootings. and they had a hearing on the advocacy of the clearances. the question is how did they get that security clearance despite a series of violent outbursts and repeated brushes with the law? >>> syria has destroyed their weapons. they started in september when they broke the agreement for syria. and this after the obama administration threatened military action against the syrian government. >> we are now in a position to conduct any further productional mixing of chemical weapons, as far as they are disclosed. and that is suppose to have happen for them by next summer. >>> be careful if you are out in georgetown tonight. they will be out and about later. there's no crooks on out there who needed to rip off three people just this past tuesday. one in wisconsin avenue, one on o street and one at m and thomas jefferson street. that robert was last seen wearing the blue jeans, riding the pegs on the back. >>> and they will not miss the scaffolding, but they
. it is a catch-22. they never expected to have snowden's revelations all over the place. it means there is almost an end to secrecy. first you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has caused and international -- an international uproar. it makes you wonder whether the government can preserve some of the secrets because there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. we could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government needs to do and our own freedom and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guaranteed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? guest: you have to ask him, i think he is a littl
countries have been doing it. if we didn't have a traitor like snowden, they wouldn't even know that we were spying. and they probably do know. the only reason that they know and their complaining is because snowden is over there. in russia, they would've arrested his family and his relatives and everybody would've been in jail. they all spy. just because they haven't gotten caught, i say that's the only thing is these republicans want to jump all over the president. we have been spying, they have been spying him everybody in this whole world spies on each other. if we identify these folks as allies, what is the value of doing that towards allies? caller: are allies are spying on us ask commission mark udall think they are? the serious. fort cherry is next, pierce, florida. just like the gentleman .ho got off the line there you have to remember, this is america. you have to keep the country safe. this is not about that one individual is about the whole nation. anything, not saying what are you worried about? are you worried about us catch and you try to do something bad? ago.ew this years th
for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our collection capabilities don't. we will have to ultimately see what the price we will pay for that is greater -- is. snowdenter the revelations came out, people now know about them, and yet this week even some legislators have said that it comes to the point where we talk about angela merkel, it may have changed the perception to even some on .apitol hill perhaps we need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have h
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
advancement. so, we've created what edward snowden has called the "turnkey totalitarian state." it's not quite totalitarian yet, but all you have to do is turn the key and it would be. . >>> hello and welcome. i'm phil torres, we'll talk about innovations that will change laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. [ ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to loo
now. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away, colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul
. the newspaper sites documents from contractor, ed snowden. those documents indicate the information collected by the nsa includes text, audio, and video. general keith alexander does dispute the post story. he says the nsa is not breaking into any data bases, but he does say google and yahoo are compelled to work with the government. >>> just moments ago, the jury began deliberations in the sean taylor murder trial. the washington redskins star was gunned down in his florida home in a botched burglar back in 2007 and on trial in miami, the alleged trigger man, eric rivera, prosecutors say rivera and four of his friends broke into taylor's house saying the place would be empty. >> tonight the suspects and three armed robberies and two days in montgomery county are at large. as kristin fisher reports, the latest happened early this morning at the cbs on tuckerman lane. >> two masked men, one with a gun entered the cvs around 4:00 wednesday morning. confronted an employee and demanded money. >> both black males in their 20s. one was wearing a fake beard, another had a ski mask with the eye ho
, thank you with that live update from fairfax county. >>> the fallout from edward snowden and his leaks continue. "the washington post" says the national security agency broke into communication centers for yahoo and google in order to steal millions of communications records from those companies. nsa director though general keith alexander denies that report. he is also denying a report that the nsa spied on the vatican. the italian magazine panorama says the nsa recorded vatican phone calls and may have eavesdropped on the conclave when the cardinals selected pope francis. >>> the justice department has joined a lawsuit against the firm which conducted the background check of nsa leaker edward snow denial. the suit was -- snowden. the suit was filed by a former employee of the national investigations service. the lawsuit claims the government was billed for background checks which were not completed properly. the just department says it's going to file its own legal complaint in this case coming up in january. >>> a report from the government accountability office finds contract guard
secret until edward snowden leaked details earlier this year and ignited a fierce public debate over the extent of nsa snooping. under the bill, written by diane feinstein, they can continue collecting and snooping as they have. they will now need congressional approval. they will need to determine whether the snooping reduces any leads. run when ars can be terrorist target called an american phone number. this protects the country, according to mrs. feinstein. i do not believe this is an imposition on people's privacy rights. diana is calling from call for now. -- california. independent line. caller: health care and how badly it was rolled out. lied to us.ey'd they told us that this was going to be great for everyone. people are losing their health care. people have not apologized. going around is saying how great everything is. he is not out here. he is in his bubble in washington. he does not understand why people are suffering out here. we are not just suffering because of the health care law, we are suffering because of his economical stuff that he has rolled out that has made
unknown by the president if it was. david ignatius can you put this in perspective and snowden's role. is he still such a menace or is he revealing things we need to know? >> first about nsa collection, it seems increasingly clear if nsa could collect a signal it would. and just add to this ever greater pile of data. analysts couldn't possibly have gone through and made sense of all the signals that they had access to. in terms of spying on the world leaders, the 35 world leaders which is the latest thing that's riled the europeans and people all over the world, it's hard to imagine, if you captured something of interest from angela merkel's cell phone that reference to that wouldn't end up in the president's daily brief. may not say obtained through surveillance of her cell phone but the intelligence would be there otherwise why would you have it? snowden revelations, just keep rolling at the world and at the obama administration. i'm surprised there's not more push back because it's triggered a response by major nations, france, germany, even britain that's been our partner said it
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
harvesting those phone calls. edward snowden has not only gotten in the middle of the united states versus the rest of the world, he's gotten in between the governments and their own spy agencies, which is perhaps one reason why the article is saying, let's not worry too much about this. let's move onto the -- >> nothing to see here. >> let's move onto the economic discussion. we don't want to get too deep in the weeds. >> you would need a greyhound depot for the buses that people are trapped under. dianne feinstein, a muscular proponent of expensive surveillance and has repeatedly carried water for two administrations to expand the surveillance laws is furious apparently by her own statements primarily because she was out of the loop. she like the president reportedly out of the loop. the nsa out of the loop compared to obviously some of their targets. the only loop that seems to work here is at the nsa itself, where you have 25,000 employees working on a bunch of important security stuff and a bunch of other stuff, which if you believe the president, is nonessential. and is not part of o
possible by the great edward snowden. would you call him an american dissident in the same way -- >> i would -- >> you describe -- you would? >> i would, indeed. one of the things i think is a fact of our lives, i think we all know it, 1984 is not a theoretical possibility but a regard reality. we're all under surveillance at all times. the wonderful thing about edward snowden and glen greenwald and chelsey manning, it's not that they're preventing it but they're watching them watching us. that's worth something and allows us to push back and demand something better. >> bill ayers, thank you, sir, for joining us this afternoon. >> appreciate it. >>> coming up, the republicans' self-destruction tour invades the old dominion. yes, virginia. and this, this is no laughing matter. >> i think liberals don't have much of a sense of humor compared to conservatives. that's my personal experience. >>> four . >>> for republicans, 2016 may begin in virginia or maybe it ends there. because in the final week of what's been a disastrous gubernatorial campaign, potential presidential candidates includ
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul cian
given to him by edward snowden tweeted that the newspaper will publish a revelation today. >>> the howard county police officer shot during a confrontation with a suspect is now recovering at home. he was discharged sunday from the hospital. officer steven houk was injured last wednesday when he and other officers confronted a man wandering in front of a car carership on route 1 in lawferl. that -- in laurel. that man stephon prather is being held without bond. >>> a love triangle leaves three dead -- excuse me -- in an apparent murder-suicide in glen bernie. officers found the body of 27- year-old firefighter andrew hoffman and his girlfriend marie hartman inside hoffman's home early sunday morning. investigators say both were shot to death by a baltimore city police officer christopher robinson before robinson then turned the gun on himself. hoffman was a third generation firefighter who just last july was honored for safely returning a wandering toddler home. >> it just shows you a lot of character on this young man who was tragically gunned down in this murder-suicide.
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
. that's according to secret documents from edward snowden. meanwhile they're rejecting allegations that they spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine says that's not true. >>> the boston red sox are world choips. last night they beat st. louis 6-1. here's the scene at fenway park. it's given the city a much needed boost. mark phillips is in the city. good morning, mark. >> what an inning. the crowd in here stood up and got louder weight for the magical moment. the triumph of perseverance. >> the red sox are the world series. >> reporter: bed lamb in boston. thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the world series championship. ite tess first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series. david ortiz was the world series mvp. >> this is for you, boston. you guys deserve it. >> reporter: outside of fenway park, groups of fans ran through the streets pushing over cars, some were pushed over. boston is where tragedy struck six months earlier. ever since the tragedy in april, the motto for the team is boston strong. players grew bear
edward snowden leaked documents that the u.s. eavesdropped on mang ello and others. >> the president feels strongly that we should collect information -- should not collect information on people just because we can, but because we should. >> a suspect, deandre weans, the alleged trigger man. witnesses said all three talked about the murder and wean said, quote, the guy should not have tried to play the hero. >> depend ability ranking find that cause made like toyota and alexus, the most reliable. in the large up scale, the lexus takes the top spot and the legacy the top side and the honda fit is the best sub compact. >> okay. good live -- little list there. none of our cars are there. >> and better connection for those with disabilities. >> this is after a man died after an altercation back in january. deborah debra alfarone was the only media there. >> the meeting you are about to see seems like any other meeting, but it is historic and it is taking place right here in maryland. >> we are ecstatic that this commission has come together. >> today's ground breaking meeting had the roo
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